I’m taking a bit of a break from Twitter, which means I don’t have anywhere to share links to interesting things I come across. I thought I’d put a few up here.

Read the rest of this entry »

John Black has another piece in The Weekend Australian, which I read against my better judgement. His point seems to be that the federal Labor government sabotaged the labour market, and particularly that it worked against the interests of employees in traditional blue collar industries.

Read the rest of this entry »

I’m trying to recreate as many of The Atlantic’s 44 most important charts of 2013 as I can using Australian data. This is part 3 of my series – part 1 is here and part 2 is here.

Read the rest of this entry »

I have a new piece in Guardian Australia about housing policy, specifically the way that restricting housing supply (in the inner cities or on the fringes) pushes prices up.

I’m trying to recreate as many of The Atlantic’s 44 most important charts of 2013 as I can using Australian data. This is part 2 of my series – part 1 is here.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Atlantic ran a piece recently titled The Most Important Economic Stories of 2013 – in 44 graphs.  I thought it might be interesting to recreate the graphs using Australian data, where possible. I’ve taken the US graphs, selected by a range of economists and economics writers in the US, and tried to recreate them the best I can using the Australian data I have to hand. The first instalment is below – I’ll try and post the rest soon.

Read the rest of this entry »

Listening to the Treasurer and others, you may get the impression that a blowout in spending has caused a structural deficit. This does not accord with the analysis of the independent Parliamentary Budget Office. I alluded to this in my piece in the Guardian the other day, but I think it’s worth quoting the PBO at length:

Read the rest of this entry »

I thought this was a particularly interesting sentence in today’s mini-Budget, in light of the anti-carbon pricing campaign over the past couple of years:

The removal of the carbon tax is expected to lower headline and underlying inflation by less than 1/4 of a percentage point in 2014-15, relative to the 2013 PEFO, which had factored in the previous Government’s policy of moving to a carbon trading system. 

Read the rest of this entry »